Tag Archives: Disability

Help! IEP Time!

23 Mar

Yes, it’s that time of year again – Time for the annual review of my son’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP).  Even though this is only a review of our existing plan, and things have been going really well for my son this year, I still feel nervous and concerned.  Let’s face it, the entire process is extremely intimidating and nerve-wracking to a parent.  Without fail, I don’t sleep the night before, I can’t eat anything that morning and during the meeting – I cry…  Yep, no matter if what is said about Gregory is positive or negative….I cry.  (Trust me – crying when receiving good news is even more mortifying than crying when receiving bad news….  ;-\)  I can’t help it; so much of myself (my efforts, my concerns, my dreams, my love, etc.) is wrapped up in my children, the emotion and the nerves just get too much for me to contain.  Well, that and the fact that I’m a total sap…

Anyway, in the hope of helping other parents in a similar position (criers or not!), I am dedicating this series of blog posts to ways to make the most of your child’s IEP process.  I’ve received a number of comments and questions on my blog regarding IEPs, so I know I am not alone in my feelings.

A good IEP is a vitally important support for your child’s future, but the entire process is confusing, fraught with emotion, and bounded by fears that even though your child is counting on you, you might not be up to the task. With so much riding on it, no wonder parents feel so daunted, anxious and overwhelmed!  Maybe a few of these suggestions will help.

Be forewarned – this is going to be a long post.  This is an important topic with a lot of ground to cover….  So as not to overwhelmed you, I’ve broken the subject into several posts.  This first post in the series focuses on the up-front legwork needed to help the IEP process go more smoothly.  So, grab a cup of coffee, take the phone off the hook and settle in…

Does Your Child Need an IEP?

You know that your child is struggling and needs help….The very first thing you must do is determine whether or not your child needs services from the school’s Special Services, or if other paths might be a better approach.  Here are a few questions to ask yourself objectively:

1.  Must your child’s needs be met during school (i.e. academic support, resource room, etc.) or might they be better met in another setting, such as tutoring at home, physical therapist (PT) at the clinician’s office or social skills in a group setting? (Finances, of course, play into this equation, since many times medical insurance doesn’t [fully] cover these types of services…)

2.  So, you’ve identified that your child needs help during school.  Now, can these needs be met within General Education, instead of Special Education?

  • My advice would be to try more direct methods first, by working directly with the General Education teacher and Guidance Councilor.  Together, you may be able to provide additional supports, behavior modifications, etc. within the general education classroom that would not require that your child to be officially ‘classified’ within the Special Education department.  For example, teachers will frequently spend extra time with a child who needs extra help.  Small group instruction (pull-out/resource room) may also be available for specific subjects.
  • The school may decide that a formal Intervention and Referral Services (INRS) team meeting is required to discuss your child’s needs and possible interventions.  This can be a good thing, as it formalizes your child’s issues and any agreed upon interventions.

3. You’ve identified that your child needs help during school, but the unofficial assistance or INRS interventions are not sufficient. Is your child eligible for Special Services? To determine this, you must formally request (in writing) that your child be evaluated by the Child Study Team (CST) of your school or district.  The CST is made of up two or more certified personnel, including the school psychologist, learning disabilities teacher and social worker.  This evaluation will assess your child functionally, academically, behaviorally and psychologically to determine where any issues or deficits exist.  The evaluation will be based on standardized testing, observations, interviews and a review of developmental and educational history.

  • A specific diagnosis of your child’s problem(s) by an outside doctor or professional may be helpful, but it is not necessary.  The IEP eligibility determination is based on academic performance and behavioral issues at school, with or without a formal diagnosis.
  • In any case, don’t wait to obtain a diagnosis report from your doctor before requesting the CST evaluation.  The process takes several months to complete and the school is not required to accept an outside diagnosis or recommendation.  The school may in fact, decide to hire its own doctor to conduct an assessment during the evaluation process.

Special Note:  If your child’s teacher or Guidance Councilor is the one who raises concerns and recommends an evaluation, be open to hearing a difficult ‘truth’.  It may be a shock to you, or you may already have had concerns of your own, but it still can be hard to acknowledge that your child is struggling.  It won’t help your child for you to deny that their difficulties exist, so stay focused on your child’s best interest.  Keep in mind that teachers see many children over the years, so they can be more objective about identifying when problems exist.  They also see your child in a different setting and circumstances that you do.  It doesn’t mean the teachers/councilors are always correct, but it is at least worth listening to their concerns and perspectives.

On the plus side, if the school suggests the evaluation, you are much less likely to have a battle on your hands to get the help that your child needs.  And rest assured, no evaluation may be conducted on your child without your written permission.

Preparation

So….you’ve decided to pursue an evaluation by the CST.  Now it is time to do your homework!  To make the most of the IEP process, it is vital that you do adequate preparation.  You are the expert on your child and must stand as his staunchest advocate.  So, be sure to cover these following steps for the best outcome for your child.

1. Understand your Child

Take time to really understand your child’s strengths, weaknesses, personality traits and interests. Be specific about your goals and desired outcomes.  It is not enough that your want your child to be ‘happy’ or to ‘reach his full potential’.  You need to have concrete goals, such as ‘read at grade level’, ‘ interact appropriately with peers’, etc.  A great tool to help parents with this soul-searching step is Hopes and Dreams – An IEP Guide for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, by Kirby Lentz, Ed.D.

2. Educate Yourself

To adequately prepare yourself for the challenges ahead, you need to do your research and educate yourself as much as possible:

  • Talk to others.  Many parents and professionals have been through the experience with Special Education and the IEP process before you.  Glean as much information and perspective as you can from those who have already gone through it.  And don’t limit yourself to just parents in your district.  Parents from other towns and even other states can provide valuable insights, as well as potential alternative approaches/services.
  • Go Off-the-Record. If at all possible, talk to your child’s teachers and administrators privately.  In so doing however, keep in mind that these individuals have a necessary allegiance to their employer (the school district) and may not be in a position to make official suggestions or recommendations.  Respect this and try to elicit open, honest dialogue by speaking off-the-record.  You can gain valuable insights into your child, available services and the system in general, from someone ‘on the inside’.  Be sure however, to always honor the ‘off the record’ status and never quote or reference those private discussions (or you’ve just burned that bridge for the future – yours and any parent following you…)
  • Attend Seminars. Many Special Education parent advocacy groups (such as the Statewide Parents Advocacy Network (SPAN) in NJ) offer free IEP seminars to parents.  Autism support organizations frequently offer seminars and conferences throughout the year – on all sorts of related topics – so be sure to get on their mailing lists.

3. Plan Your Strategy

Ok, now that you have fully educated yourself about your child, your rights, the process and the available therapies, it is time to strategize.

  • Be Realistic and Flexible in your Demands.  Yes, you want the world for your child, but be realistic about how much your child can reasonably handle at one time.
    • Focus on your top priorities at this point in time.  Priorities shift over time, as your child develops and his/her needs and issues change – and so can the IEP….it is not carved in stone, and may be modified at any time.  Identify a list of ‘ nice to have’ services.  These are not your top priorities, but if you school is willing to provide them, then great.  If not, you at least have a bargaining chip.
    • By understanding what services are in place and readily available within your district, you may be able to work within the system to meet your goals…maybe not all, but most.  Just because you heard about a great new treatment option that you are convinced will benefit your child, doesn’t mean that your school district will – or even can – provide it to your child.  The school is limited to a set of standard, proven and approved therapies (i.e. ABA Therapy).  You may need to work very hard to get a new therapy/approach onto this ‘approved’ list of services.
    • Be open to supplementing with services, therapies and/or supports outside of school – and to trying new approaches.  It may not be exactly or everything you were hoping for, but every little bit helps.
  • Walk in Their Shoes. When negotiating anything, it is vital to understand the other side’s position, goals and constraints, so that you have a better chance of developing a win/win result.  In this case, understand that the school district has a different set of priorities and goals than you do.
    • Special Services is tasked with providing an ‘equal’ and ‘adequate’ education to your child and they are held to budgetary and administrative constraints dictated by the government, Board of Education and other bodies.  Schools do not have unlimited resources (manpower or funds), so they need to apply those resources judiciously to provide the most benefit to the most children.  (And as taxpayers, we want them to spend our tax dollars wisely, don’t we????)
    • Acknowledge that unlike you as the parent, the school is not looking (nor is obligated) to provide the ‘best’ education for your child.  You are concerned with helping your child be the best that he/she can be, but the school’s primary concern is that your child is educated to the established standards.
  • Seek Support.  If you suspect that there may be some question about your child’s eligibility for Special Education, or if you are just not confident tackling the process on your own, consider speaking with and perhaps hiring an advocate.  Some districts/states automatically provide parents with an experienced parent advocate to facilitate the process, which can be an invaluable resource.

Initiating an IEP and dealing with Special Services can be overwhelming, emotional and intimidating, however with the appropriate preparation and planning, you can make the most of the process for your child. You can better understand your child’s challenges and work together with the school’s ‘team’ to meet your child’s needs most effectively – and that’s what I call a win/win!

Stay tuned for Part II of Making the Most of your IEP….

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On His Own?

12 Oct

When you look at your 10 year old child and dream of his future, do those dreams include having him live with you forever?  Mine sure didn’t…

Last fall, I attended a certificate program in Special Education and Autism at the local community college.  Gregory had been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome (AS) the year before and I was still actively trying to learn as much as I could about the disorder and treatments.  The course required that each of us interview an Autism Service Provider and prepare a presentation about their services. 

Gregory had been attending a therapeutic social skills group for boys his age at a nearby mental health center for about 6 months.  I knew that this center also serviced adults on the spectrum, so I opted to interview the director of the Adult Aspergers Services Group (who also happened to lead Greg’s AS group).  Happily, the director (Eve) was most willing to meet with me and discuss the services offered to adults on the spectrum.  So, I prepared my set of questions and set off for the interview, feeling upbeat and studious.

During our discussion, Eve informed me that this group (adults over 21, with AS, High-Functioning Autism or PDD-NOS) is very under-served, with some people having to travel over two hours to participate in a program because nothing closer is currently available.  Most of these individuals had not received any type of services as children and had been misdiagnosed, if diagnosed at all.  Due to their generally poor inter-personal skills, most of the group members are un[der]employed, still live with their elderly parents and have very few friends or spouses.  This clinic offers these individuals a variety of different programs, including counseling, college planning, workforce skills, personal/hygiene, life skills, social skills and recreation.

So think about this…  Most of the participants in Eve’s programs are college graduates and in many cases are highly intelligent.  But due to their quirky behaviors and inadequate social skills associated with Aspergers Syndrome, they are frequently unable to obtain and/or retain meaningful, gainful employment.  Since their employment is so limited, these individuals cannot afford to live independently.  In most cases, these highly intelligent, highly skilled individuals have no option but to live with parents in the bedrooms of their childhood.   OK, that’s not ideal you might think, but living with your parents isn’t all bad, right?

But what happens when their elderly parents become infirm or pass away?  These Aspies, unable to support themselves or function adequately within society, frequently fall under the auspices of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) and are put onto waiting lists to join a group home.  The DDD is set-up to provide a certain level of support (financial and otherwise) for adults who are developmentally unable to take care of themselves and live independently.

The problem comes with the rapidly growing backlog of people needing placement in group homes.  With 1 in 100 children currently being diagnosed with Autism (according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), this is the fastest growing developmental disability in the US.  Without adequate treatment, these children will grow into adults who require a lifetime of continuing services from the DDD.  Although there is already a significant shortage of DDD group homes and other appropriate facilities, there is currently no plan in place to meet the needs of this rapidly expanding population.

As alarming as those facts sounded, they didn’t touch me directly until Eve casually said, “So, you should put Gregory onto the waiting list right now.  Then, by the time he needs it, there might be a facility available for him.”  I blanched and struggled to understand what she was telling me.  I must have misunderstood.  “Do you mean that you think Gregory will never be able to live independently?” I asked in shock…  That couldn’t really be what she meant – She worked with Gregory – She knew how bright and talented he was.   Eve didn’t answer directly.  She looked at me sadly and nodded.

And with that, my world shifted on its axis.  Confused and reeling from the news, I couldn’t think straight.  “No!!!” I wanted to shout, “That can’t be true!”  But I didn’t.  I am sure my face and body language conveyed my distress, but I tried to calmly gather my papers, thank her for her time and exit as quickly as possible.  Going down in the elevator, I shook my head in denial as tears welled up in my eyes.  I held myself together until I got to my car…and then the floodgates of despair opened.

Suddenly, I was seeing the future in a different light.  The possibilities were not bright, wide open and endless as I had once thought.  Gone were my hopes of Gregory making his own way in the world – finding success and fulfillment through his career of choice.  Gone were my hopes of holding a grandchild in my arms while Gregory and his wonderful future wife look on proudly.  Gone were my dreams of globe-trotting to exotic ports with my husband during our empty-nest years.  Instead the future looked dark and bleak and hopeless.

I cried and cried, trying to get my head around this future that I had never imagined.  Of course, I was willing to do whatever needed to be done to help and support my son, but would he really need all that?  Yes, Greg has his quirks and struggles with some things, but overall he is doing well in school, managing things at home and progressing well.  Surely, he would one day be able to live on his own…

But as I thought about why Eve made her recommendation, I came to see some of the unspoken factors that may have lead her to that conclusion.  As one example, Aspies are frequently lax in their personal habits, because they don’t value the benefits the way an Neurotypical (NT) brain does.  An Aspie doesn’t see well through the eyes of an NT (and vice versa!) and therefore may not fully appreciate that it is not pleasant for that NT to see or smell an unkempt person, much less work or socialize with one.

Yes, Greg is perfectly capable of bathing himself and putting on clean clothes, but if I weren’t there to guide him, would he see the need to do these things on his own?  Perhaps not – perhaps he would go unwashed and wear the same clothes for days.  Yes, at some point in the future Greg could probably shop for groceries and cook a meal, but would he value the need to eat a balance diet and make the effort that that requires?  Perhaps not – perhaps he would eat his favorite take-out pizza 7 nights a week.  Yes, Greg could make his bed, vacuum his room and do the dishes, but on his own, would he choose to do so???  And the list goes on…finances, home maintenance, health, fitness, socializing…  In society, we do necessary ‘chores’ on a daily basis – even if we don’t feel like it.  We do these tasks, because we NTs are aware of the societal benefits of them and the consequences of not doing them.  An Aspie may not value the benefits the same way, and may not even be aware of the consequences that society will impose for not doing so…not a recipe for success.

It dawned on me that, even if Greg could eventually obtain stable, gainful employment and earn enough for his own place, it may not be sufficient for his needs.  For although Gregory would most likely be capable of doing all the tasks required of living independently, without guidance he may not choose to do those tasks.  And that is where an on-going NT influence (whether it be me, a roommate, a wife, or the Resident Assistant at a group home) would be beneficial.  And a group home, filled with fellow Aspies, might be a very positive, nurturing experience.  It could be a very comfortable, supportive environment within which Gregory could thrive – understood and appreciated by those around him.

So eventually I came around to appreciating Eve’s recommendation for what it was….good advice.  We don’t know what the future holds for Greg.  And while I sincerely hope that he will eventually lead a fulfilling, happy life on his own, I can see that some on-going beneficent NT oversight will most likely be necessary.  His father and I will not be around forever, so it is prudent for us to plan for his future.  As much as my heart resists it, we should sign Greg up with the DDD, so that at least he has that fall-back option should he need or want it.   Sigh….

To be honest, having come to that decision months ago, I still haven’t taken any action.  That future seems so remote and Greg’s progress has been very impressive over the last two years…  Besides, AS is becoming almost cool these days, with documentaries and box office movies being made about it and Aspie characters starring on almost every hit tv series.  As the general public becomes more aware of AS and the unique strengths that many of these individuals possess, future employers may very well be seeking out Aspies with lucrative, adapted job opportunities, instead of shying away from them in fear, misunderstanding and/or censure.

In a wonderful book by Temple Grandin and Kate Duffy – Developing Talents:  Careers for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism, the authors suggest ways to identify and tap into the potential talents of those on the spectrum.  This sage, practical book discusses all aspects of the search for suitable vocations – providing invaluable career advice to and from real people with AS.  So taking all this to heart, I am not abandoning my hopes and dreams for Gregory’s future.  Sure, he might take a little bit longer to ‘launch’ and he may benefit from on-going supports, but that’s OK.  Working together, we will do our best to prepare him for an independent, successful life – one on his terms, of his choosing.  That is my dream.

*  *  *  *  *  *

In spite of society’s growing awareness and acceptance, it remains an urgent priority to address the needs of the expanding autistic population within our social services across the country.  Stop-gap measures must be put in place immediately to address the huge gap in current unfulfilled needs within these organizations.  But equally critically, a strategic plan must be developed to address the anticipated needs of the future.  Society cannot just put its collective ‘head in the sand’ and hope these problems will go away.  We owe it to ourselves;  We owe it to our children…

Let’s make it happen!    – Joanne

The Hidden Curriculum

21 Sep

In the Autism/Aspergers world, I’m what is known as a neurotypical or NT, while my son is known as an Aspie or Aspergian.  Although some (like my older brother!) might argue that I am anything BUT ‘normal’, my brain does function fairly typically.  The brains of people with Autism and Aspergers however, do not, and this enables them to see the world in atypical ways.  As such, in my efforts to parent successfully, I’ve had to adjust my NT thinking, to try to see the world through my son’s eyes…with his Aspie brain and unique perspectives on life.  And this has taken some getting used to….

Without realizing it, neurotypical folks constantly, instantaneously and seamlessly survey the written rules or ‘hidden curriculum’ of every environment and every person [we] encounter, to make decisions about how to proceed successfully within a given context.[1]

The hidden curriculum refers to a set of rules or guidelines about social behavior that are often not directly taught.  It is assumed knowledge that helps lubricate the cogs of society and enables groups of people to live, work and interact together harmoniously.  These rules are wide-reaching and complex, covering a variety of topics from table manners to slang words, dating protocol to classroom etiquette…and much more.  Virtually every aspect of our daily lives is based upon a foundation of hidden curricula – widely-held assumed knowledge that we probably don’t even remember learning.

We don’t recall learning most of these rules, because “everybody just KNOWS that!”  We NTs are unconscious social navigators and learn naturally through observation and intuition.  We take it for granted that all relatively smart people should be able to acquire these skills in the same manner.  Unfortunately, for those with Aspie brains, these skills are not acquired naturally.  In spite of being potentially brilliant in other intellectual arenas, they have what is called social-cognitive learning disabilities when it comes to the hidden curriculum

An example of this lack of common understanding occurred recently in our home.  Gregory had been dared to do something stupid [my words!] by another boy, so he did it.  When I questioned Greg about why, he answered, “because he dared me…I had to.”  But, instead of reprimanding him for making a bad decision, I backed up and reconsidered.  “Greg, just because someone dares you to do something, doesn’t mean you HAVE to do it.  You can CHOOSE to accept the dare or not.”  Greg looked at me in amazement…”You can?”   He had totally misunderstood the social rule and believed that there was no option with a dare – no matter how stupid.  I shudder to think what might have happened if he still believed that ‘rule’ into his teenage years…Yikes!!!

So, this deficit can create significant problems.  The inability to develop adequate social skills and interpret social nuance of those around them brings life-long challenges to Aspies.  We, as NT adults in society, are willing to explain and excuse social ‘misbehaviors’ in very young children, but as they get older, kids and certainly adults are expected to know these unwritten, unspoken items of general understanding.  How do we react when someone breaks the ‘social code’?  We are shocked, upset, angry and perhaps even disgusted.  “How rude!” or “Weirdo” or “Can you believe this guy?” rings through our heads.  Because, breaking a hidden curriculum rule can make that person a social misfit or even a social outcast. 

What can we do to help those with social-cognitive deficits?  These individuals must learn the hidden curriculum by direct instruction versus intuition.  Parents and educators must become ‘social anthropologists’ to first determine various hidden curriculum items and then find ways to teach them.  This is not an easy task, because we assume everyone knows the assumed knowledge!  We literally don’t know what to teach them, because we don’t know what we know…

One of the primary ways to recognize an example of hidden curriculum is when an error occurs.  When a teenager addresses the principal as “Dude” or when a young man at the urinal drops his pants all the way to the floor.  When a girl texts using ALL CAPS and the receiver thinks she is shouting at her.  When a man in an office talks over his boss to correct the boss’s ‘error’.  When a woman talks loudly in church or during a movie….you name it  – There are rules for just about every interaction we have on a daily basis.  And when a rule is broken, people notice.

To make things even harder for Aspies, the hidden curriculum is not just vast, but it is complex and elusive as well.  The rules change across age, gender, who you are with, culture, environment, etc.  And to add another layer of complexity, most Aspies have difficulty generalizing, so what they have learned for one situation may or may not be carried over to a similar situation – the hidden curriculum rules must be explicitly taught for each scenario!

There are a variety of methods that may be used to help your child acquire unwritten social knowledge, many of which you can read about in available reference material.  One fabulous book, from which I gained my first insights into this area, is called The Hidden Curriculum by Brenda Smith Myles.  Here are a few methods from the book that I have employed successfully with my son:

1.  Safe Person

Identify one or more ‘safe people’ at home, school, camp, etc. who can help your child with Hidden Curriculum questions.  Your child should trust this person and be willing to ask about social questions.  This parent, teacher, mentor or close friend should understand the deficit and be willing and able to provide accurate, clear clarification to the meaning of words, phrases and situations.

2.  Social Narratives

Social narratives describe social cues and appropriate responses to social behavior and are useful in teaching a new social skill in advance of the situation.  Social narratives often use pictures or cartoons to promote self-awareness and self-management.  The most popular social narrative type is Social Stories by Carol Gray, which prescribes a specific framework for the narrative.

3.  Social Autopsies

The renown educator Richard Lavoie developed the concept of social autopsy to help students understand social mistakes – after the fact.  This method clarifies what exactly happened and then enables the child to see the cause/effect relationship between his behavior and people’s reaction to it.

4.  Direct Instruction

The direct instruction method is the one that I use most frequently in our daily lives, albeit informally.  Through direct instruction the teacher models (or states) correct behaviors and the students practices correct or alternative behavioral responses.  One great tool for direct instruction is the Hidden Curriculum One-A-Day Calendar for Kids by the Blackwell Family.  For each day of the calendar year, there is one specific need-to-know lesson.  In our home, we read the calendar item at dinner time and then use it as a jumping off point for discussion and explanation.

 

These days, I often explain situations and teach the unwritten rules of our daily lives.  I am never sure how much Greg has absorbed about the hidden curriculum on his own, so I explicitly try to help him “navigate body language and social mores in the uncharted areas between the words.”[2]  I guess I’ve been a bit over zealous lately however, because the other day Greg groaned and said, “Mom, can you please stop making everything into a lesson!”  Note taken!

Understanding the hidden curriculum is vital to the acquisition of good social skills, independence and a fulfilling life.  Most of us learn these rules naturally, but Aspies need a road map to our complex, elusive NT social world.  So please – let us all practice tolerance.  Let’s open our NT minds and try not to judge ‘misbehaviors’ too quickly…. That ‘rude’ person may just be an Aspie – seeing the world a little differently.


[1] Brenda Smith Myles, The Hidden Curriculum:  Practical Solutions for Understanding Unstated Rules in Social Situations (Autism Asperger Publishing Co., 2004), p. 1.

[2] Stephen M. Shore

To Tell the Truth

17 Aug

 “Greg, the doctor has discovered that your brain does not work the same as most people’s…”  That is how the discussion with my 8-year-old started…

There is much debate about the age at which your child is ready to learn of his diagnosis.  After all, you want your child to have good self-esteem and a carefree childhood; why worry him already?  Since every situation is unique, there is no ‘correct’ answer to this valid concern.  But I believe that everyone manages better when they understand what they are dealing with – and that goes for children as well as adults…

If your child is old enough to be aware that “he is not like other kids”, then you are not protecting him from pain by keeping him in the dark about his disability.  You are in fact, increasing his sense of isolation and poor self-esteem by negating his feelings and not acknowledging his difficulties.

For years, my son Gregory was dragged back and forth to various types of doctors, undergoing numerous tests and evaluations, in an effort to identify why he was struggling so much socially, emotionally and physically.  I tried to be vague and upbeat in response to his questions about why he had to go see another doctor, but I never specifically identified to him where the areas of concern lay.  I didn’t want him to label himself, or to feel like he was somehow ‘wrong’ ….surely ignorance is bliss, right?

But as time passed, Gregory began to tell me that some kids didn’t like him or thought that he was ‘weird’.  He would tell me that kids didn’t want to sit next to him at school because of his ‘noises’ [tics].  And one day, when he was 8 years old, he announced to me, with a sort of thoughtful self-revelation,  “You know Mom, I’m not like other kids.”  Pressed for more, he responded, “We just don’t think the same.”  But my heart nearly broke when Gregory, beside himself with self-condemnation and frustration, sobbed uncontrollably, “Nobody understands me!   I just can’t….can’t….can’t help it!”

In fact, the kids (and perhaps teachers and other adults) had already unofficially ‘labeled’ Greg in their minds, based on his strange behaviors….I don’t blame them for this – his behaviors were definitely odd.  But more importantly, Greg had also already labeled himself as strange and different – an outcast – and he blamed himself for it.

So, when we finally confirmed the diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome with a pediatric neurologist, I decided to share the news.  I first shared the diagnosis, along with some educational material, with our family and a few close friends.  I didn’t know yet what AS might fully entail, but I wanted to help them better understand and accept Gregory.  I also knew that Barry and I could definitely use the emotional support of our relatives and friends!

After thinking long and hard about it, I also shared the news with Gregory.  Although he was still so young, based on the feelings of inadequacy and isolation that he had already expressed, I believed he would find the information  comforting, rather than disturbing.  I hoped he would be able to redefine himself from being ‘weird’ to being someone with AS.  So, I took him aside and calmly discussed his diagnosis in terms that I hoped he would understand and find reassuring:

“Gregory, you know how we’ve been taking you to lots of different doctors lately?  Well, Dr. SyTe has discovered that your brain does not work the same as most people’s.”  Greg looked shocked, but since I was calmly smiling, he was open to hearing more.  “That is good news and bad news,” I said.  “The good news is that one part of your brain is really, really smart.  The bad news is that the other part of your brain has some trouble, which is why you have difficulty managing your emotions and making friends sometimes.”  Gregory nodded his head, acknowledging these troubles.  “So,” I continued, “we need to work really hard to get the ‘smart’ part of your brain to ‘teach’ the other part of your brain the things it needs to learn.”  Then I asked him if was willing to work hard to help his brain and he enthusiastically answered, “Yes!” with a great big smile!  Phew!!!  I then presented him with a cute little book for kids, entitledCan I tell you about Asperger Syndrome? so he could learn more about the disorder.

To be perfectly clear here, most people do NOT have this discussion with their young kids.  I later learned that we are in a small minority of parents who inform their elementary-school-age child of his disability.  But I am convinced that it was the right thing to do for us.  Gregory handled the news very well, and I believe, was greatly relieved to find a logical explanation for what he was going through.  It validated his feelings and provided him exclusive membership in a special group of people.  And then, as I provided him with more information about the disorder and talked to him about some famous people who also have AS, he began to take it on, as almost a badge of honor.  Greg began to understand his strengths and challenges, and why they existed, and was therefore willing to accept that he needed to work to change his behaviors.  We no longer heard the distraught, “I can’t….can’t….can’t help it!” 

Coupled with our family’s growing understanding and acceptance of his issues, Greg’s knowledge of his condition allowed him to take control over himself, and gave him some ownership of his progress.  We would talk about his challenges (and strengths!) as a family, so that his siblings understood the issues and what we were trying to accomplish together.  And when we worked on social skills, and other topics at home, ALL the kids got into the act, and I feel that each of us benefited.  Greg is no longer stigmatized, but accepted, understood and valued, so that at least under his own roof, he has a safe place to be ‘just himself’.

Over the last two years, we have continued in this pattern of openness with Greg, his siblings, his peers and teachers, and as a happy result, his support circle of acceptance has expanded exponentially.  That acceptance, along with numerous programs, has enabled Gregory to grow into himself.  He is now relaxed and happy – most of the time!   He is a beautiful, bright, talented, funny 10-year-old boy.  And oh yeah, he also happens to have Aspergers Syndrome.


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