Tag Archives: Classmates

Little Comedian

14 Sep

“Mom, do you want to hear a construction joke?” asks my then 9-year-old Aspie.  “Sure!” I say indulgently.  “Hmmm….I’m still working on it.” he says, with perfect deadpan delivery.  I pause a moment, waiting… and then burst out laughing!  I never saw that one coming….very funny!

Shortly after figuring out Greg’s diagnosis, I read that among the many challenges faced by Aspie’s, being too literal and social deficiencies are typical.  After giving these issues some thought, I decided to implement a Joke of the Day program.  My objectives were three-fold:  1) Send a little ‘love note’ for my son to find during his school day; 2) Use jokes to encourage him to think ‘outside the box’ and not see only the literal interpretation; and 3) Give him a tool to grease the wheels of social interaction with his peers.

So I went about pulling together all sorts of cute, simple, kid-appropriate jokes.  I typed them up, and then printed them out on slips of paper. (I made 2 copies, because I decided to include my older son in on the project too.  My daughter couldn’t read yet… much to her chagrin!)  Then, each morning I took one joke slip each, folded it up and put it into their lunch boxes.  Gregory and Daniel often wanted to check out the joke ahead of time, but I always made them wait until snack or lunchtime…building the anticipation, just like any great raconteur!  I suggested that after they read the joke themselves, they should try it out on their classmates.  And later over the dinner table, I would ask one of the boys to tell us the Joke of the Day.  This meant that they got to practice their joke telling skills and we could then explain it, if the ‘funny’ aspect wasn’t clear to their literal minds.  “Ohhhhh…I GET it!”

It started out a little slow, but within a couple of weeks, my boys were clamoring to see what the next Joke of the Day was.  As hoped, Greg started to tell the joke during snack to the kids around his desk.  I guess the laughs started getting attention, because before long, snack time found Gregory standing in front of his 3rd grade classroom, clearing his throat and waiting for quiet (luckily the teacher was supportive!)  It became part of the daily snack ritual for Greg to tell a joke to the entire class – to mutual groans or giggles – and the kids started asking him for it.   This was all great, until I forgot to include a joke one morning….doh!  (Greg gave me a firm ‘talking to’ that afternoon, let me tell you!)  Apparently, the class was very disappointed until Greg saved the day by resurrecting some ‘old material’ (thank goodness for his fabulous memory!)   He was able to offer his classmates their daily chuckle, in spite of my failing!

At the playground after school, I would smile to myself when I would hear one kid telling another kid my Joke of the Day!  Sometimes the joke didn’t quite make the translation….sort of like that old “Telephone Game”, but it did show my plan was working.  One mother even told me that her child was upset that she didn’t get a Joke of the Day in her lunchbox too!  Clearly we were on to something…

What I hadn’t anticipated was how well Greg took to it….he is a natural joke teller (who knew?)  His timing and delivery are spot on, and he frequently incorporates different voices, accents or inflections to add to the comedic value.  He is really very funny.  My little comedian was born! 

Greg doesn’t rely on my meager offerings anymore.  Now, he reads joke books all the time, gathering his own material, in order to regale his classmates and family members with impromptu ‘stand up’ on a daily basis.  He loves making people laugh and has gained a bit of fame and status among his peers for his comedic prowess.  Gregory has also expanded his repertoire to include not just jokes, but funny stories and tv show scenarios too (along with all the applicable voices, of course!)   These days, some boys actually vie to sit with him at lunch, because as the kids tell their mothers (who in turn tell me), “He is so funny!”

I’m thrilled that my informal ‘curriculum’ has proven so successful.  It has enabled Greg to expand his mindset to see alternate interpretations to a phrase or situation.  It has enabled him to lighten up and not take himself (or life!) too seriously.  It has laid a ground work for successful social interaction and it has given him a source of success and self-esteem.  Objectives met!

So with that, I’ll leave you with today’s Joke of the Day:  Did you hear the one about the clown fish?  Or is it a mollusk?  Oh darn….I forget…   Oh well, as my husband will tell you, I am the worst joke teller ever –  I’d best leave the funnies to my little comedian!

P.S.  If you would like a copy of my jokes to start a Joke of the Day program of your own, please let me know….I’m happy to share!  They are corny, but effective!

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A+ for the Teacher

24 Aug

From my years as a Project Manager, I’ve learned the importance of teamwork for a successful outcome.  When I first faced the unknown obstacle of Gregory’s Asperger Syndrome, I tackled it the best way I knew how – with my ‘business analysis’ hat on to determine the best way to help Gregory improve his behaviors and coping skills.  I researched as much as I could and then turned to recruiting key players within the school to become part of our ‘team’ to address these issues.

We were very fortunate that Gregory had a wonderfully experienced, nurturing woman as his 3rd grade teacher.  Mrs. A had been working hard to help him, relying on her instincts, since we didn’t yet understand the issues.  She was in fact, one of the people who drove my search for answers, after she made an insightful comment about Greg, “I think there is more going on here [than Tourettes].  I have never seen a child be so hard on himself.”  Mrs. A would be the first prospective ‘team member’ that I approached.

The Monday after my fateful “Date Night Diagnosis” [see previous post], I presented Mrs. A with my suspected discovery.  She wasn’t very familiar with AS, but she was thrilled that we had found a direction.  She immediately wanted to know what she could do to help, so I provided her with a small booklet entitledSimple Strategies That Work by Brenda Myles.  I had my first team member on board… We were off and running!

In the weeks that followed, we initiated the IEP [Individual Education Plan] process and shared the news with other key personnel in the school.  Our team was shaping up nicely, and as more and more information was shared with the various team members, strategies to support Greg within the school environment started to take shape.

Once Greg’s condition was officially diagnosed by the neurologist, I confirmed this with Mrs. A.  Then she asked, “How would you feel about sharing Greg’s condition with the rest of the class?” I was shocked!!!  Why should I further ‘label’ my son, who was already struggling with his peers?  “I think it might help them understand him” she continued.  I wasn’t comfortable with the idea, but I said that we would think about it.

I pondered the question…  On one hand, I am a proponent of ‘knowledge is power’, so surely it would be positive to share the information?  And my business experience further supported the idea of sharing information across the team…but were Greg’s classmates really part of his ‘team’?   Would this just give them ammunition with which to torment him?

I tried to put my mothering instincts aside to think more objectively:  If my child has already been unofficially labeled as ‘weird’ or ‘different’ by other kids, teachers and adults, then an official ‘label’ can only help matters.  Knowledge of his diagnosis might help deflate negative judgments and promote acceptance of his problematic behaviors.  I felt sure that Greg’s classmates had already unofficially ‘labeled’ him in their minds, so sharing the official diagnosis would be positive, right?

Gregory was already aware of his diagnosis and was a key player on his ‘team’, so following my belief in sharing information, I decided to discuss the question with him directly.  I told Greg what Mrs. A had suggested and why, and then asked how he would feel about that.  He thought about it for a minute and then slowly answered, “I think that would be OK.”  I asked him if he was sure that he wanted the other kids to know about his AS and he said, “Yes, they might understand me better.” Alright….if he was comfortable with sharing the news, then maybe I should be too….

I then asked him if he wanted to be in the classroom while Mrs. A talked to the kids.  As an alternative, Mrs. A had offered that he could help out the Kindergarten class with a project if he preferred.  Greg was excited by that prospect and opted to help the Kindergarteners.  So, we had a plan…and Gregory had surprised me once again by his open acceptance of his condition.

The day came when Mrs. A spoke to the class very sensitively about Gregory’s syndrome.  (I was a nervous wreck all day!)  She started by talking about how each of us is different and that some people have certain problems, like allergies or poor eyesight.  (She used herself as an example, because she has both!)  Mrs. A then described, at a very high level, some of the things that are difficult for Greg, and how the class might be able help him during those difficult periods.   The kids not only listened, but were amazingly positive.  Eager to show their new comprehension, they exclaimed, “Oh…THAT’S why he does” such and such behavior…  And then the class brainstormed ideas on how they might support Gregory during his tough times.

I have to admit that it was a bit of a stretch for me to extend the ‘sharing of information’ to kids, but I accepted Mrs. A’s suggestion and followed Greg’s lead.  After school Mrs. A assured me that it had gone even better than she expected.  “The kids were SO accepting!” she marveled proudly.  I’m sure the manner in which she presented had much to do with their response, and I give her full credit for its success.

And a complete success it has turned out to be!  Now, instead of looking at Greg oddly as he retreats under his desk during a period of stress, some of his classmates will quietly kneel down to his level and try to calm him down.  When they see him starting to get upset about something, they tell him, “Don’t worry Greg.  It’s OK.”  When he is in tears about some disappointment or frustration, the kids (both boys and girls!) check on him and try to cheer him up.

I witnessed it myself one day….and was awed by the kindness and sensitivity of his peers:  I happened to be at the school playground for pick-up a few minutes early that day.  Greg’s gym class was working on the Presidential Fitness module, and had just done the mile run.  Greg, not particularly physically strong or coordinated, felt that he had ‘failed’ the test by not achieving the desired speed.  He was sitting on the playground sobbing – feeling like a loser.  One by one, a boy or a girl from his class approached him to see if he was okay and/or to try to cheer him up. “Greg, are you ok?” asked one concerned boy. “Don’t worry Greg, I didn’t make it either.” soothed one girl.  And then the ‘pièce de résistance’, a girl who had previously teased and tormented Gregory repeatedly, approached him.  I held my breath, afraid of how she might ridicule him and plunge him deeper into his emotional abyss.  But no, she kindly said, “It’s OK Greg.  You’ll do better next time.”  I was dumbstruck….  Tears welled up in my eyes, grateful for the kindness of these children, who had been lead to understanding and acceptance through the guidance of their inspiring teacher.  Thank you Mrs. A – You’re the MVP of our team!

 

No one has yet fully realized the wealth of sympathy, kindness, and generosity hidden in the soul of a child.  The effort of every true education should be to unlock that treasure.               – Emma Golmam

 

 

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